Matthew Ringgenberg

Professor; David Eccles Faculty Fellow

Department of Finance

Faculty, Tenure Track

Matthew Ringgenberg is a Professor of Finance at the University of Utah. His research focuses on the role of institutional investors in financial markets. Specifically, he has examined how the actions of short-sellers, hedge funds, mutual funds, and exchange traded funds interact with various frictions to affect real economic activity and the formation of asset prices. His research has been published in the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Financial Economics, and the Review of Financial Studies and has been cited in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, The Economist, and The New Yorker. In 2023, his paper “Reusing Natural Experiments” won a Brattle Group Distinguished Paper prize at the Journal of Finance. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for Management Science and the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis and he previously served as a Guest Editor at the Journal of Corporate Finance. He is a cofounder and President of the Four Corners Center for Research on Index Investments (https://www.fourcornersresearch.org/), which aims to foster and advance research in the area of index investments by developing strong ties with industry practitioners to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and to provide collaboration.

Prior to joining the University of Utah, he was an Assistant Professor of Finance at Washington University in St. Louis and before his academic career, he worked as a consultant for Charles River Associates in Chicago. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 2003, a M.S. in Economics from the University of North Carolina in 2009, and a Ph.D. in Finance from the University of North Carolina in 2011.

Visit his independent website at: www.matthewringgenberg.com

 

Toggle All Sections

Education

PhD 2011, Finance, University of North Carolina

MS 2009, Economics, University of North Carolina

BBA 2003, Finance and Economics, University of Wisconsin

Research Summary

Financial markets are used throughout the world to allocate capital to productive uses. As a result, financial markets have a significant impact on economic activity and the well-being of individuals. My research examines the role of a key group of participants in financial markets who account for nearly 70% of all investment in U.S. public companies: institutional investors. Specifically, my research examines how the actions of short-sellers, hedge funds, mutual funds, and exchange traded funds interact with various market frictions to affect real economic activity and the formation of asset prices.