Eccles Newsroom

/Eccles Newsroom/

Is a bad reputation a deal breaker? Not for some startups

2021-10-11T17:30:52-06:00October 11th, 2021|

An investor's bad reputation may not be a deterrent for startups seeking capital — as long as the investor stays out of the startup's business. A new paper from Bill Bill Schulze and Robert Wuebker shows that startups are willing to accept funds from venture capital firms embroiled in lawsuits. “The results are intriguing,” the authors said. “[They reveal] underexplored relationships between corporate reputation(s) [...]

Lost wallet? More money may mean you’ll see it again

2021-10-11T17:30:23-06:00October 11th, 2021|

Nothing can ruin your day quite like losing your wallet. But it turns out having larger amounts of cash may increase your chances that it gets returned. The Eccles School's David Tannenbaum and his colleagues "lost" wallets all over the world, and found that they were often returned, especially if there was money in them. "One clear pattern that emerged was, remarkably, wallets with [...]

Does a name change lead to a higher stock price?

2021-10-11T17:29:50-06:00October 11th, 2021|

Recently the stock that used to trade under the ticker CREE made a switch — and saw a healthy jump in their stock price. Is it a coincidence that the former CREE, now Wolfspeed trading as WOLF, outperformed the market after it changed? Probably not, according to Michael Cooper, Professor of Finance. A name like CREE carries no meaning, while WOLF has instant recognition [...]

New data shows unemployment benefits do not discourage job hunting

2021-08-11T12:18:52-06:00August 11th, 2021|

Governors and legislatures around the country are hoping that ending Unemployment Insurance (UI) will light a fire under those who are seeking jobs. But a new study shows the end to those benefits hasn't had the anticipated outcome. “To evaluate the impact of the expiration of additional (unemployment insurance) payments, we asked respondents whether this expiration will influence the time and effort they devote [...]

Confidence, Credibility, & Strategic Leadership

2021-07-29T12:33:33-06:00July 29th, 2021|

The Goff Strategic Leadership Center theorizes that successful strategic leaders demonstrate skills across six specific dimensions (what we refer to as the Six Principles of Strategic Leadership). This model of leadership indicates that competence in these six areas contributes to high levels of individual, team, and organizational success. Research conducted by faculty at the University of Utah provides insights into each of these principles, and describes specific strategies for how leaders [...]

New DAs decrease police violence, new study shows

2021-07-16T13:34:32-06:00July 16th, 2021|

When a new district attorney takes office, police kill fewer people, according to a new study from Allison Stashko, an assistant professor in the Business Economics Group. "Deaths decline no matter what the new prosecutor’s political party or policy platform might be," Stashko writes. "During that time, we find no changes in arrest rates or assaults on police officers. That suggests that officers can [...]

Amplifying voices benefits everyone, including underrepresented voices

2021-06-17T15:35:10-06:00June 17th, 2021|

It often seems like team meetings result in some voices being heard, while others are completely overlooked. Similarly, sometimes credit is misassigned to someone who didn't actually offer up the idea. The phenomenon is a concern to many, and particularly women and people of color. However, the use of amplification, publicly endorsing someone's idea while giving credit to that person, can give underrepresented voices [...]

The case for a culture of experimentation in business schools

2021-06-16T15:56:40-06:00June 16th, 2021|

The scientific method is no longer the sole domain of scientists, and business schools need to train students to embrace a spirit of experimentation. That's the premise set forth in a new article from the Harvard Business Review co-authored by the Eccles School's Elizabeth Tenney, assistant professor of Management; Elaine Costa, Management Ph.D. student; and Ruchi Watson, assistant professor of Entrepreneurship & Strategy and [...]

Five inspirational quotes from the Sorenson Impact Summit

2021-06-07T17:24:35-06:00June 7th, 2021|

The seventh annual Sorenson Impact Summit with SOCAP Global took place May 25 through May 27. The summit featured three days of inspirational conversations around innovations in impact investing, building equitable entrepreneur ecosystems, the future of higher education, and using data to drive impact. This year, the summit gathered virtually, with the objective of delivering a more inclusive and accessible summit. For three days, [...]

Understanding COVID-19: Research during a crisis

2021-06-07T17:06:24-06:00June 7th, 2021|

On Friday, June 2, University of Utah experts and health researchers came together to discuss how scientists and others mobilized to learn more about COVID-19 and to combat the epidemic. University of Utah scientists discussed their research and addressed the numerous unanswered questions emerging from the COVID-19 crisis. Two of the experts who spoke during the event were Taylor Randall, dean of the David [...]

Here’s why data and dialogue are key to improving equity, diversity and inclusion

2021-06-01T14:42:17-06:00June 1st, 2021|

Ninety minutes. That’s all it took. I gained a deeper understanding of how data informs an elected official’s thought process regarding racial and ethnic disparities in Utah. He, in turn, reviewed the data and considered how he might incorporate this data into policymaking. Both of us acknowledged the importance of the issue, need for increased opportunities and inherent strengths that can help Utah improve. [...]

Jonathan Brogaard named to Poets & Quants 40 Under 40 Professors

2021-05-04T14:46:13-06:00May 4th, 2021|

Poets & Quants has named the Eccles School's Jonathan Brogaard to its annual 40 Under 40 Professors list. Brogaard, a professor of Finance, currently teaches Advanced Finance in the Executive MBA program. "I get pretty excited about teaching. It is a lot of fun, and I hope that comes across to the students," Brogaard said. "It is probably corny to say, but the process [...]

Credit cards are affecting our brains – and our spending

2021-05-04T14:36:27-06:00May 3rd, 2021|

It has long been known that credit cards encourage spending — but no one knows exactly why. New research from Sachin Banker, assistant professor of Marketing, helps shed some light. “You’re basically feeling more reward when you shop with credit cards,” he said. “We don’t see that with cash. It was actually a very stark difference.” Get the full story in The Wall Street [...]

Passive prose is keeping research from reaching the masses

2021-05-04T14:32:03-06:00May 3rd, 2021|

Ever struggled to understand a scholarly article, and ended up passing it over for citation? Turns out you are not alone. New research shows that abstract, technical, and passive prose keeps important research from reaching the masses. Tianyu Gu, an assistant professor of Marketing and colleagues show that readers struggle to understand this type of writing, and therefore tend to pass it by. Read [...]

Work-life balance sparks viral discussion following British man’s heart attack

2021-04-27T13:46:54-06:00April 27th, 2021|

A heart attack made Jonathan Frostick re-evaluate his life priorities, and while recovering, the British man wrote a now-viral post on LinkedIn where he vowed to find a better work-life balance. We become so attached to our job identity that we will work long, arduous hours to protect it, Eccles School Professor of Management Glen Kreiner told New York Times. “Sometimes, that’s why it [...]

The PPP program could be leaving women of color entrepreneurs behind

2021-04-27T13:38:02-06:00April 27th, 2021|

Women of color are driving small-business growth during the pandemic. But many are missing out on help such as the Payroll Protection Plan offered by the federal government, despite having applied. “All of us in economics and strategy are predicting an enormous surge in economic activity due to pent-up demand,” said Lyda Bigelow, associate professor in the Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy at the [...]

Low-income Americans – especially minorities – are being cheated on property taxes

2021-04-09T16:36:34-06:00April 9th, 2021|

Members of marginalized communities tend to live in homes that command lower prices due to the accumulated effects of racism, yet their properties are often assessed at inflated values. That's according to research by Troup Howard of the Marriner S. Eccles Institute for Economics and Quantitative Analysis. The New York Times cited Howard's study in a recent op-ed on the inequities of assessing property [...]

Is passive investing degrading informational content of markets?

2021-04-09T16:33:44-06:00April 9th, 2021|

Passive investors are known for being steady. They don't follow every fluctuation in price, or listen to trading floor gossip. That passive approach may be messing up price signals and making business decisions harder, according to research from the Eccles School's Jonathan Brogaard and Matthew Ringgenberg. Discover how in The Atlantic.

Utah home to hottest job market in the U.S., according to WSJ

2021-04-09T11:48:51-06:00April 9th, 2021|

The pandemic has been hard on the labor market, but Utah seems to be bucking that trend, according to new analysis from The Wall Street Journal. Utah had the lowest average unemployment rate and highest number of people working or looking for jobs. “We went into the pandemic well-positioned,” said Natalie Gochnour, associate dean at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business. [...]

Adam Looney: The case for targeted student loan debt relief

2021-03-23T17:18:30-06:00March 23rd, 2021|

Student debt relief has become a hot topic in the Biden administration, with many calling for across-the-board forgiveness. But Adam Looney, executive director of the Marriner S. Eccles Institute for Economics and Quantitative Analysis, says a more targeted approach is in order, since much of the debt - 36% - is owed by individuals in the top 20% of income distribution. Read Looney's full [...]

How to ask deeply personal questions, with Eric VanEpps

2021-02-12T17:23:56-07:00February 16th, 2021|

Sex, money, politics ... we've been raised to avoid these topics in polite conversation. But one Eccles School professor, Eric VanEpps, has some new research that sheds light on what turns a regular question into a sensitive one. He recently shared his thoughts with the Freakonomics podcast. Give it a listen.

Statewide mask mandate benefits picking up press mentions

2021-01-11T13:25:05-07:00December 17th, 2020|

New research by several Eccles School faculty is showing up in news articles across the country. The research shows that state-wide mask mandates benefit local economies and provide health benefits. County-or-city-wide mandates do not appear to have the same benefits. Read more about the research in Forbes, The Washington Post, CBS Money Watch, The Chicago Tribune, and the Mississippi Free Press.

Does the middle class get a bad deal from the U.S. tax system?

2021-01-11T13:09:20-07:00December 11th, 2020|

The tax burden on the middle-class is a huge talking point for politicians. But is the burden actually that onerous? New research from Adam Looney and his colleagues shows that many in the middle class get more benefits than they pay in taxes. Read about their findings in The Washington Post.

New study: Statewide mask requirements save lives, livelihoods

2020-11-24T15:48:23-07:00November 24th, 2020|

Researchers at the Marriner S. Eccles Institute for Economics and Quantitative Analysis have found that statewide mask requirements not only reduce the transmission of COVID-19, but they also spur more economic activity, while countywide mask requirements actually depress economic activity. “The thing that really pops out,” said lead research Nathan Seegert, assistant professor of Finance at the Eccles School, “is that statewide mask mandates [...]